Thursday, May 1, 2014

Windows XP is the new asbestos



At the beginning of this month, I was publishing an article about Windows XP being dead. As predicted in my article, but I admit that it doesn't take a genius to make such predictions, Microsoft released an ultimate security update on the day that it declared WinXP's support to be over.

I was also predicting... (still doesn't take a crystal ball) that computer mafias would have a peak of activity in launching their new viruses for Windows XP, since nobody's gonna come and save the day for WinXP users.

Microsoft has recently released an advisory bulletin about a security issue with Internet Explorer (IE). It concerns all versions of IE on all versions of Windows. This issue is critical and is already being exploited by malicious people. Just by visiting the wrong website with IE, the website would be able to remotely take control of your computer and install whatever program it wants so that the mafias can, whenever they have the time, do what they want with your computer. That means recording all your keystrokes and making screenshots of what you do so that they obtain your credit card details. That also means copying your computer's files in case there's anything with a resale value. That also means using your computer's calculation power for mining bitcoins, which they won't share with you. It also means using your computer to launch attacks against new targets (DDOS or just using you as a proxy). Or using your email program to send viruses to your contacts. Or using your hard drive for storing and streaming illegal videos that perverts will pay for viewing. Or finally, encrypting all the content of your hard drive and demanding a ransom before they unscramble it.

That security issue in IE will NEVER be fixed for Windows XP. If you're still using WinXP, your system is now obsolete and it is risky to use it.

Conclusion

WinXP is the new asbestos. Get rid of it! Replace it! FAST!

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